Physics vs calculus


Also, in the grand scheme of things (i.e.

Additionally, all engineering students must take calculus-based physics.

Some of the calculus in physics gets into Calculus 3 (vectors and multiple integrations, dot products, line integrals, etc) and even into the realm of differential equations.

Algebra vs. Calc based Physics? I am accepted for fall 2010 at UFCOP-Orlando! learning and practicing medicine), whether or not you took algebra- vs. calculus-based physics is all but irrelevant. Fortunately, one can do a lot of introductory physics with just a few of the basic techniques. Theoretical physicists or mathematicians? AP Physics 1 is an introductory, algebra-based, college-level physics course. I have the option of taking either algebra or calculus based physics next year, in prep for the MCAT (I will be a junior). AP Physics 1 was designed to be a first-year physics course which you can take without prior physics experience. Typically, algebra-based physics is just plain easier than calculus-based physics. Also, in the grand scheme of things (i.e. I am guessing because the material is not as in-depth. It covers derivatives such as the power rule and basic integration of definite integrals and indefinite integrals. I am currently taking college level General Physics that's non-calculus based, but I'm having a hard time understanding some of the concepts. Your opinion on general physics with/without calculus?

Some of the calculus in physics gets into Calculus 3 (vectors and multiple integrations, dot products, line integrals, etc) and even into the realm of differential equations.
I did well and understand basic physics concepts after the physics with algebra course. After the calculus sequence, the next courses you'll need for physics are differential equations and linear algebra.

Case in point, less than 10% of US med schools require calculus itself, never mind calculus-based physics. I have taken calculus up to multivariable (or calc III) and I can see all the connections in my head but my physics class does not apply calculus at all.
A calculus-based physics course in college would be what AP physics C emulates. I would advise you NOT to take physics with calculus. All courses require a background in Calculus; check the course descriptions for details. The same is true for Physics 142L, 152L and 162L. AP Physics 1. I explain why there are algebra based and calculus based physics courses on the same material. With Calc I-III, differential equations, and linear algebra, you'll be pretty well prepared for everything you'd encounter in introductory physics. The solution to essentially any problem involving fluids--whether the design of a sprinkler system, a dam, or common fresh water and sewage house piping, for instance--requires knowledge of fluid mechanics.

Case in point, less than 10% of US med schools require calculus itself, never mind calculus-based physics. For physics, you'll need at least some of the simplest and most important concepts from calculus.

And physics extends into many disparate systems: like dynamics, continuum mechanics, thermodynamics, chemistry, quantum mechanics, optics, et cetera. Calculus of variations itself is a math topic, so what particular physics application do you have in mind? I have the option of taking either algebra or calculus based physics next year, in prep for the MCAT (I will be a junior). Einstein's theory of relativity relies on calculus, a field of mathematics that also helps economists predict how much profit a company or industry can make.

It is acceptable to mix and match these courses (e.g.

Taking Physics I and Calc II are the normal way a lot of engineering programs schedule the classes and personally I think it is the smart thing to do. Physics and calculus overlap like China overlaps the Gobi Desert. Calculus analyses things that change, and physics is much concerned with changes. In physics, for example, calculus is used to help define, explain, and calculate motion, electricity, heat, light, harmonics, acoustics, astronomy, and dynamics.

But which is the smarter science?